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Frozen Shoulder And Its Treatment

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By Author: StTheresas
Total Articles: 11
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Frozen shoulder is a painful condition in which the shoulder becomes stiff and inflamed, and movement becomes limited. Frozen shoulders are also called adhesive capsulitis. Signs and symptoms typically begin gradually, worsen over time and then resolve, usually within one to three years.

Frozen shoulder occurs when the strong connective tissue surrounding the shoulder joint (called the shoulder joint capsule) becomes thick, stiff, and inflamed. (The joint capsule contains the ligaments that attach the top of the upper arm bone [humeral head] to the shoulder socket [glenoid], firmly holding the joint in place. This is more commonly known as the “ball and socket” joint.)

Frozen shoulder most commonly affects people between the ages of 40 and 60, and occurs in women more often than men. In addition, people with diabetes are at an increased risk for developing frozen shoulders. Physical therapy, with a focus on shoulder flexibility, is the primary treatment recommendation for frozen shoulder.

Symptoms of Frozen Shoulder

The main symptoms of a frozen shoulder are pain and stiffness that make it difficult ...
... or impossible to move it.

If you have a frozen shoulder, you’ll likely feel a dull or achy pain in one shoulder. You might also feel the pain in the shoulder muscles that wrap around the top of your arm. You might feel the same sensation in your upper arm. Your pain could get worse at night, which can make it hard to sleep

You’ll typically go through three phases with a frozen shoulder. Each has its own unique symptoms and timeline.

Click for Youtube Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_XYHmv9rxw&t=1s

Symptoms of frozen shoulder are divided into three stages:

1. The “freezing” stage
In this stage, the shoulder becomes stiff and is painful to move. The pain slowly increases. It may worsen at night. Inability to move the shoulder increases. This stage lasts 6 weeks to 9 months.

2. The “frozen” stage

In this stage, pain may lessen, but the shoulder remains stiff. This makes it more difficult to complete daily tasks and activities. This stage lasts 2 to 6 months.

3. The “thawing” (recovery) stage

Shoulder motion slowly improves during the “thawing” stage. Complete return to normal or close to normal strength and motion typically takes from 6 months to 2 years.

For More Information -https://sttheresashospital.com/surgeries/frozen-shoulder-and-its-treatment

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