123ArticleOnline Logo
Welcome to 123ArticleOnline.com!
ALL >> Education >> View Article

Comprehension Skills Or Strategies - The Masked Confusion

Profile Picture
By Author: voiceskills
Total Articles: 26
Comment this article
Facebook ShareTwitter ShareGoogle+ ShareTwitter Share

What’s the difference between comprehension skills and comprehension strategies? Are they synonyms or do we teach different things when we are teaching them?
Comprehension skills and comprehension strategies are very different things.
They are often confused; the terms are often used interchangeably by those who don’t understand or appreciate the distinctions they carry.
And, most importantly, these concepts energize different kinds of teaching altogether.
The older of the two terms is “reading comprehension skills.” It was used occasionally throughout the Twentieth Century, but really took off in a big way in the 1950s.
Professional development texts and basal readers were replete with the term and its use burgeoned for a span of three decades before slackening a bit.
“Comprehension strategies” were rarely heard of until the 1970s. The term was much in use throughout the 1980s, both because of the extensive strategy research and because those promoting comprehension skills appropriated the newer, trendier label- Like old wine in new bottles.
Use of the term strategies finally overtook skills in 2000, but not necessarily because the practices of teachers actually had changed.
Basically, the term comprehension skills tend to refer to the abilities required to answer particular kinds of comprehension questions. Skills would include things like identifying the main idea, recognizing supporting details, drawing conclusions, differencing, comparing and contrasting, evaluating critically, knowing vocabulary meaning, and sequencing events.
The old basal readers would make sure that students got plenty of practice with particular comprehension skills ensuring they practiced answering particular kinds of questions.
Of late, the core reading programs do pretty much the same thing with the educational standards, with each standard being translated into a question type in lessons and assessments.
For most of these skills, there are no studies showing that they can be taught in a way that leads to higher comprehension, and even in those few instances where there is such evidence, the effects are quite minimal .This is probably due to greater attention to reading the text than to practicing the so-called “skills."
In fact, there have been a number of studies and logical analyses showing that these skills lack any kind of psychological reality. They are indistinguishable from one another in test performance, though that hasn’t stopped instructional designers from trying to come up with programs that would teach these skills in a way that would benefit achievement.
There has been a lot of research into question types over the past 50-60 years. Despite the claims, this body of research is a morass. There are numerous variables that may be affecting any of these results that it would be impossible to distinctly know what it all means.
Reading has much more to do with being able to read particular kinds of texts and to deal with particular kinds of text features than to answer particular kinds of questions. The common belief is that if texts were easy, students could answer any kinds of question about them, while with sufficiently complex texts, they couldn’t answer any question types, no matter how simple.
Each text presents information in its own way, and reading comprehension is heavily bound up in the readers’ knowledge of the topic covered by the text. As such reading comprehension (different than decoding) is not a skilled activity, per se.
If comprehension is not a skill, then why has that been such a popular way to teach it? Initially, the concept fit the times. In the late 1950s when it “broke out,” B.F. Skinner’s version of behavioural psychology (e.g., stimulus-response, programmed learning) was in vogue. The idea that learning would result if we could simply induce particular responses to questions and then reward kids for their answers-rinse and repeat-seemed very convincing.
It has been harder to eradicate than a fungus, because it appears to map onto educational standards and the high-stakes tests. Principals and teachers assume it makes sense to practice the “comprehension skills” that tripped the kids up on the tests. So, they “use their data”: combing through test results to identify the kinds of questions that students failed on and then practicing those supposed skills over and over in the hopes the students will be enabled to answer such questions on the next test. Sadly, that it hasn’t actually worked doesn’t seem to dissuade them at all.
The basic premise of strategies is that readers need to actively think about the ideas in text if they are going to understand. And, since determining how to think about a text involves choices, strategies are tied up in meta-cognition (that is, thinking about thinking).
Comprehension strategies are not about coming up with answers to particular kinds of questions, but they describe actions that may help a reader to figure out and remember the information from a text.
For example, the idea of the summarization strategy is that readers should stop occasionally during reading to sum up what an author has said up to that point. Doing that throughout a reading and at the end has been found to increase recall… recall in general, not of any particular type of information.
Another frequently studied comprehension strategy is questioning. Students read, stopping throughout to quiz themselves on what the text says (and going back and rereading if one’s questions can’t be answered). The point isn’t to ask particular kinds of questions, so much as to think about the content more thoroughly, more actively than one would do if they just read from the first word to the last.
These kinds of actions-these strategies-are used intentionally by readers to increase the chances of understanding or remembering what one has read.
Comprehension strategies need to be practiced too; however, they aren’t learned by repetition and reinforcement, but by gradual release of responsibility (including modelling, explanation, and guided practice).
On the other hand, there are very good reasons for teaching comprehension strategies, but there are at least three big problems with that kind of teaching.
First, studies of comprehension strategies have tended to be brief, usually about 6 weeks in duration (there are exceptions). Somehow that has been translated into substantial amounts of strategy teaching across students’ school lives. To be perfectly honest, no one, including me, knows how much strategy instruction is needed. But there is certainly no evidence that there are benefits to be derived from 8 to 10 years of 30-35 weeks of strategy teaching.
Second, the only point to using strategies is to make sense of texts that couldn't be grasped without that effort. Many texts are easy enough that a reader would not need to expend that amount of energy in comprehending. Unfortunately, most strategy instruction that I have seen takes place in texts that frankly are relatively easy for the students to read. That means they have to pretend to apply those strategies in situations that wouldn’t benefit from such effort. If students ever do apply these strategies to complex text, they are usually on their own. Most skip the effort since what such teaching conveys is that you don’t need strategies.
Finally, even major proponents of explicit comprehension strategy instruction argued that as important as it was to teach strategies, teachers needed-even when teaching them-to make sure the students were actually learning the text content and not just the strategies they were using to think about that content. That principle largely has been ignored by teachers and Educators.


For more info https://voiceskills.org/

More About the Author

VOICE Research and Training Institute is the brain child of KALVI Higher Education and Research Institute, Madurai, South India with the expertise and knowledge to empower learners in the communicative skills of the English Language running through the Industrial Hub of a community that influences a country at large.

Total Views: 37Word Count: 1207See All articles From Author

Add Comment

Education Articles

1. Why Is The Thakur Institute Of Management Studies, Career Development & Research (timscdr) Is The Be
Author: GirishDM

2. 14-year-old Aditya Pachpande On A Mission To Donate 15,100 Uvc Covid-19 Sterilization Kit To The Und
Author: Namrata Jena

3. Top 10 Schools In Bangalore
Author: Royale concorde

4. Which Is The Best Management Or Mba College In Mumbai?
Author: Mithun Mumbai

5. How To Use Fabric From The Company Hyperledger
Author: Block chain council

6. Tips For Advancement In Engineering Studies
Author: Kamal Bhatt

7. What Is The Use Of Overseas Education Consultants?
Author: Rajesh

8. Best Online Defence Coaching For Nda Major Kalshi Classes
Author: MKC

9. How Teachers Can Create A Work-life Balance?
Author: Deepak kumar

10. How To Become A Writer
Author: Deepak kumar

11. Cbse Maths Tuition Through Virtual Learning Removes Anxiety Among Students
Author: Vishwajeet kumar

12. Fast And Trusted Do My Homework Help
Author: Sophia Lee

13. Upsc Full Form In English : Upsc Ka Full Form Kya H
Author: Krishna

14. What Should You Know About Mixed Martial Arts Hoppers Crossing Point Cook?
Author: Marco Stoinis

15. Inter-state River Water Disputes In India
Author: Current Affairs Review

Login To Account
Login Email:
Password:
Forgot Password?
New User?
Sign Up Newsletter
Email Address: